Project 50-Set a New Personal Record

PR in the United States means “personal record”.  The Brits will say “PB” for “personal best”.

Personal Record

One of my Project 50 was to set a new personal record.  At the time, it was thought I would do this running. Whether it be break 24 hours at Umstead, or a new PR at the 100 mile distance, or maybe beat my 5K or 50 mile time.

Knee surgery and osteoarthritis entered my life. I have set new PR’s. They’ve been on the bike  and not the run.

It’s kind of cool tackling a new activity. Every distance is a PR.  4 miles, six miles, ten miles! These are all the farthest distances I’ve biked before.

PR Bike Distance: 12.7 miles!! Woohoo! Yay me!!

It is a good milestone to have. I hope to look back on this in December 2017 and reflect how far I have gone. I  intend on completing a century (100 miles) ride in 2017.

Have you set a personal record or personal best this year?

Project 50: Ride My Bike on a Mountain Bike Trail

Mountain Bike Trail

 

I did it! I made it to a mountain bike trail! I have to admit, it was pretty fun. I may have a new outside sport. I only started riding my bike after my knee surgery in May. I wasn’t very comfortable on the bike.  I have kept riding. I’ve gradually gotten a bit more seasonsed riding the bike.

Camp Tuscazoar

Camp Tuscazoar

The Dirt Line Community has been building great trails at Camp Tuscazoar that I have been running on the last few years. I learned they were building “beginner” trails on the east side of the camp-just what I need! I was able to get out and help build trail.  We’re not done building trails there, we can still use help!

I had a day off from work, it was sixty degrees outside, a weekday, a perfect chance to try out the new trail.  Off I went! It was fun! I think I had my bike in granny gear the entire time.  I need to have some work done on my brakes.  But I liked it enough that I could see myself biking much more on trails!

I didn’t go far. The trail was a bit too soft, as it had rained overnight, and I didn’t want to cause damage.  I could tell what fun this could be if the trail was dry.

Bike WashNow I will have something to look forward to as I ride my bike on the trainer this winter!

Women Wednesday Series

Women Wednesday

 

Welcome to Women Wednesday! This will be a new series to spotlight women accomplishing tremendous goals.

Finishes All the World’s Ironman Races

First up is  the first female triathlete to finish all the Ironman races in the world!  This is Elizabeth  Model, who didn’t begin running marathons until she was forty and completed her first Ironman at age 46.  When Model decided to go for this goal of all the branded Ironman races, there was only 15 or 16 in the world. As WTC, the company that owns Ironman bought up other races, she continued to race them until she completed all of them, the last being  Ironman Maryland in October 2016.

Oldest Woman in Space

When Peggy Whitson, aboard a Soyuz rocket headed to  the International Space Station, she made world history by being the oldest female in space at age 56. This is her third long-duration mission aboard the ISS.  She also holds three other records: the first female commander of the ISS; she has spent more time in space than any other woman, and she was the first female non military Chief of the Astronaut Office.

 

Sets Another Fastest Known Time

Heather Anderson, also known as Anish, flies or I should say “hikes” under the radar.  Which is kind of a pity, because she is rocking big goals.  She holds the unsupported speed record (that means  she takes no outside support, no car rides to town) on both the Pacific Crest Trail and Appalachian Trail-not the female record, the overall record.  Anderson set another unsupported record on the 800 mile Arizona Trail, completing it in 19 days, 17 hours and 9 minutes.  The supported record is 15 days, 22 hours and 39 minutes.

Congrats to these awesome women crushing it out there!

Blogging Goals 2017

Blogging Goals 2017

Blogging goals 2017

I stumbled across an Instagram photo about blogging goals for the year, and realized I have not set any concrete blogging goals. It’s always been an idea to improve my blog and get more readers. This past year I added Adsense and Amazon Affiliate marketing in a first attempt to monetize my blog.  That has really not made me any money,  but it’s a first step.

I know goals need to be S.M.A.R.T, which I have not thought out yet for 2017.  Here are the general goals I have moving forward for Kim.today:

Blogging Goals for 2017:

Make my blog sustainable-which means to bring in enough money to pay for itself

Write and keep up with my Women Wednesday series.

Create an email list and newsletter.

Make some video posts!

Increase my blog traffic

In other news, I WON NaBloPoMo! I have published a blog post for every day in November including the weekends. Being able to schedule posts is a life saver, especially if you are away from the interwebs for the weekend.  It was a bit difficult to do at times, but I achieved it! (I have a post scheduled for tomorrow called Women Wednesday.)

I won NaBloPoMo

 

What are your blogging goals for 2017?

Run at Mohican: Meet at the Covered Bridge

I re-discovered this essay of mine.   has always been a favorite training ground for me. Perhaps it’s time to go north and renew my soul. Enjoy!

“Run at Mohican.  Meet at the Covered Bridge.”

Covered Bridge Mohican

This was a Facebook post from Don Baun. Although I can’t join in this weekend, for this run, it just stimulated my Mohican yearnings, and our runs from Mohican.

My first introduction to running at Mohican was via Regis Shivers. I was an ultra-newby. I had just stopped by his house, to meet him, and his friend Jerry, another Mohican veteran, when I got the invite: “We’re running Mohican tomorrow, wanna come along?” Folks, I was just off my first ultra (50K) finish and IT-Band injury. My long run before the injury was 7 miles. Now I was planning on 13+ miles at Mohican! I happily joined up.

Gas Line Hill

This was where I met Tanya Cady and Roy Heger, two very experienced ultra runners. This is where I was running with Regis, who kept falling with a lot of alarming regularity (it turned out to be new bifocals) on these beautiful trails. My most favorite memory is running on the Orange Loop (the mountain bike trail) above the campground, thinking “oh there is no way I could run this at night” –which is now, such a happy memory, whenever I run this section at night. On the same “Orange Loop” (mountain bike) section I’ve remarked to Cheryl Splain on numerous occasions, we must hit and activate the secret “biker sounds” on this section.  I cannot ever remember running this section, without hearing a Harley cycle down on the road. Spring, summer, fall, winter, I seem to always hear a Harley through here.

 

The Covered Bridge is where we stage many training runs out of. It’s usually a simple post on the Yahoo! Mohican Group Page: Hey, running at Mo, run the Orange/Purple/Red-Green Sections, meet at the CB at 8 am… Experienced and late arriving runners can figure out where we are, and meet up. The Covered Bridge is the little epicenter of the previous Mohican 100 race Courses. Meeting at the CB means you can cover as little as 4 miles, and run as many as 50+ miles, meeting back up at your vehicle for refueling.

The Covered Bridge, and the little hike to Lyons Falls, is a big tourist attraction.   Lyons Falls MohicanThere is limited space at the CB for parking, and I’m sure sometimes us runners hogged it all. In 2008, a person found out what it meant for the “no parking” sign. A tree fell, right on a car in the “NO PARKING” zone. I guess the Park meant it about the no parking there!

Mohican Bridge

Many shivering pictures taken in front of the bridge as the last late comer arrives,  quickly snapped so we can head out on the trails. New runners to Mo arrives, are welcomed into the family. New friendships are built as folks find others with similar paces. No one gets left behind, because there are usually plenty of seasoned Mohican runners who can find shortcuts and trails-or not-to add or cut off miles.

Running at Mohican seems to be both preventative and curative medication for many a tired soul.  Mohican Trees Red Loop There is something about the beauty of the pine groves, Mark Godale Sighting Mohican the single track through the woods; the water crossings are there to wash away our troubles. Even that last mile back to the Covered Bridge-whether it’s splashing through water filled trail next to the river, or the 12 bridges on the Hog Hollow Trail (Green Loop) is beautiful.

Hog Hollow Trail Mohican Ohio

Even though it’s usually a huge relief to see that Covered Bridge again after covering 10/15/32 miles, it’s a bit sad to know that it’s almost time to leave.

First water crossing

Soaking the legs in the Clear Fork Branch of the Mohican River, in the shadow of the Covered Bridge, has also become part of the tradition. But usually after the soak, it’s time to get the smelly runner body in the vehicle, to wait for the next email: “Run at Mohican. Meet at the Covered Bridge.”

 

Books On My Reading List

Books on my Reading List

(This post contains affiliate links. If you click on a book, it will take  you to Amazon, where if you buy the book thru my link,  I receive a few pennies.)

One of my goals for 2017 is to read more books.  I’ve started a list of books that I want to read.

Thanks to Hamilton: An Americal Musical many of my books are about American History these days. I am still reading Chernow.

Then I want to read     Burr by Gore Vidal. I may have read this a few years ago. I’m sure after I start reading it I will remember. Or not.

I found this American Revolution Book I bought 16 years ago and still have not read: The Founding of a Nation by Merrill Jensen  

I bought this book several months ago and have not started it yet.

There are the books already on my Kindle that I have not gotten around to read yet.

 

I’ve heard very good reviews of this book:  

A fellow runner’s book I have not read yet:

A short book by Brendan Leonard:

Also recommended was this book:

Did you read books still? Any recommendations after  I finish these?

Amish Country Half Marathon Report 2016

 

Amish Country Half Marathon Report

I conquered the hills! Again! This was my fourth year running the Amish Country Half Marathon in Berlin (pronounced BURR lin) Ohio.  This is a nicely organized half marathon held the Saturday after Thanksgiving.

I was quite unsure whether to attempt to run this.  But I finally figured if I was going to have any chance of finishing Tarawera 60K in February, I need to get a base of some endurance miles under my belt. I checked the finishing times and saw a few people finished around four hours. Okay, I could walk the whole 1/2 marathon if needed and still finish, as long as the knee co-operated.

This is a tough little half marathon. The hills are no joke. Amish half marathon course profile

My running revolves around my knee these days, whether I like it or not. The first mile, which is downhill, was completed very gingerly.  It did not feel good.  It wasn’t until I started climbing uphill (which doesn’t bother the knee) and topped out that I felt happy.

I decided that would be the barometer of my run, whether I was happy in each mile.  I was doing well. I would power walk up the hills, and then rather slowly amble down.  (I used to love bombing downhill. Oh well.)

Iris and I began chatting about mile six. She was from Virginia, visiting relatives in my town! go figure.  She and I stuck together for most of the race.  That helped me get through the somewhat tiring flat sections on the course.  I warned her that there were hills toward the end.

Best Water Station Ever

Around mile 12, there was a home made water station manned by three Amish children. On a little table, there were styrofoam  cups.  There was a piece of tiny paper taped to each cup. I picked one up. It said “good luck”.  I had to drink that glass of water!! I’m glad I stopped there!

I climb the almost-last hill, turn onto State Route 39, and head toward the finish line at the high school. My knee has gone pretty much numb. I’m tired since I didn’t train for this, but I’m moving well and then I head downhill.

CRAMP!

Aaah! A cramp starts on my right hamstring. I stop and grab it.  I could tell it would like to go into full blown cramp and do the “relax, relax, it’s okay” and try and stand up straight. I’m less than a half mile from the finish line!! Iris and the 3 hour pacer catch up as I start to walk briskly and tell them no, it’s not a knee blow up just a pesky cramp reminding me that I’m not ultra human these days.

Finish

Another small twinge hits right before the track finish and I slow down a bit, the three hour pacer is still behind me, and I would like to finish under three. I thought if I “could run it” I could finish in around three.  Iris and I head for the hot buttered noodles! Yes there was the finisher medal AND CHEESE BLOCK!

 

pre race Amish half marathon

Finish Time

I finished in 2.58.21.  I would have been happy with “a finish”.  This race was a very good idea.  I ran much more than I would have, if I was just in a training run around the block.  The knee held up, and while I was tired, it wasn’t as bad as I thought I would be. Next up, get a 20 mile run in.
Amish finishThis is a well organized half marathon with real hills! My only constructive criticism (that I will email to RD) is they need a cardboard box/garbage can at the water stops for cups. Yes, it’s a small half marathon, but someone is out there picking up the cups.  If there is a receptacle for cups I would use it! (Note: after I drank the awesome water at mile 12, I put my used cup under one of the other cups.)

amish country medal

Did you run a race this weekend? Did it exceed your expectations? Did you get a block of cheese and an Amish hat and beard?