Category Archives: Girl Power

A Late Summer Bike Tour of Northern Ohio

Late Summer Bike Tour Northeastern Ohio
I wanted to get in a bike tour on the last hurrah of summer. (It’s still summer people!!!)

My friend Jim lives about one mile from the Western Reserve Greenway. Since I was going to be at his house after volunteering at the YUTC, it made sense to travel up this Rails to Trails to visit a part of Ohio that I haven’t really experienced.

Out and Backs

I don’t like out and backs. That is where you run/bike out a route, then turn around and retrace your steps. Boooring.

Created a Loop

I created a loop. I looked for the most bike trails I could find in the north eastern Ohio area.

How to Map a Route

I used a few resources for this. Rails to Trails Conservancy website will show you all the trails in the area you wish to bike. The State of Ohio has created an interactive trail map. Ohio Bikeways  was another source of trail intel to consult. Once I found all the off-road trail segments, it was time to consult “Ride with GPS” to make a route.
Ride with GPS is a good resource. It can show you elevation, print a cue sheet, print out your route, send your route to your phone, etc. You can look up other people’s routes and “pin them” to your account and ride their route.

The Route as Planned

The route is bike the Western Reserve Greenway almost to Ashtabula. Hop off the trail and ride roads over to Geneva-on-the-Lake. Spend the night with my Warmshowers hosts,  Carol and Pat.  Ride my made up route over to Painesville, where I will pickup the Maple Highlands Trail. This trail, albeit in about three segments, totals about 18 miles. After that, it will be road riding back over to the Western Reserve Greenway, back to my friend’s home.

Mileage

Day One About 50 miles. Originally I was going to ride the road portion first, but I want to get to my Warmshowers home at a decent hour. That will leave 72 miles for Day Two.

Considerations

Weather-will the remnants of  Florence hit Ohio by then? The forecast looks like warm weather, what about first thing in the morning? Will it be colder up by Lake Erie, what about wind? I don’t want to carry anything extra. Can I make it to this donut shop before it closes at noon on Monday?

Tune in for my next episode when I recap my ride!

My First Gravel Grinder Ride

My first Gravel Grinder Ride

This is my “Almost Week off Work” Vacation. Today I decided to travel over to the Woodbury Wildlife Area in Coshocton County and follow a “gravel grinder” route that I found on Ride with GPS.

Woodbury Wildlife Area

Woodbury Wildlife Area in Coshocton County is the largest public hunting and fishing area in Ohio. Their 19,000 acres is operated by the Ohio Department of Natural Resources specifically for wildlife recreation. This area was strip mined back in the 70’s.

What’s a Gravel Grinder?

Gravel grinders are gravel road races and rides that combine riding on surfaces such as asphalt, gravel, dirt, some singletrack trails and maintenance or B roads. Like county roads or township roads in the country.

Ride with GPS

I stumbled upon a FB Group called Ohio Gravel Grinders, who had recently completed a ride at Woodbury. I had never thought to go ride there! It’s all deserted country roads, not as hilly as my neighborhood-that’s a good place to ride! I downloaded their Ride with GPS route and set out for a bike ride.

Issue One

My turn sheet mentions turn on Township Road 70. This definitely says 

Township Road 62. My map is not detailed enough to discern (later, this road does become Township Road 70, as 62 branches off, clear as mud..)

Down the road I go. It’s quiet, except for the critters chirping, no noise in my headspace. I am pleasantly surprised to find woodland here in Woodbury! I thought it was going to be all open space due to the strip mining.

 

The ride is going okay. I’m breaking HARD on the downhills-the loose gravel makes me nervous, I don’t want to crash my bike. Maybe I need to look at disc brakes instead of the more traditional caliper or V brakes that I have.

I Lose the Phone

I am still following my planned route when I stop to double check on the phone. Doh! The phone has disappeared! Luckily, I remember where I last checked it. Back UP the hill I just coasted down.

dropped phone

Now I’ve doubled back a mile or so. I decide to make the turn instead of continuing my planned route. I don’t feel up to a 32 mile ride on gravel today.

I am keeping on eye on my phone battery power. Since I’m now relying on the Google Map, I don’t want it to die on me. It is amazing that I have cell phone coverage in Woodbury. This is a desolate area. Cell phone reception has come a long way.

My route goes well, the road turns appear as they should. My last road is County Road 17, which is asphalt-YAY! Asphalt makes for a nice change of pace from gravel.

I don’t like the two little (BIG) hills that I have to bike up in my littlest gear to get up. At least I didn’t have to walk it. Note: I did walk up a few hills on gravel. A few were too steep for me, and one had gravel that was loose and I wasn’t getting traction, the rear wheel was sliding around. Not safe enough for me.

It was a good ride. I will ride over at Woodbury more often.

BHAG Bike Tour Announcement

BHAG Bike Tour Announcement

I finally have a BHAG about biking. This post was first penned as “Dream Bike Tour Announcement” but it’s not going to be a dream it’s going to be a GOAL.

goal

This bike route has intrigued me from my first reading of Jill Homer’s book “Be Brave Be Strong” when I didn’t know anything about biking. I thought it was just a good epic read of an adventure.

Accounts of the route would drop into my reading space every now and then, they would always be interesting for the huge suffer fest that the riders experienced. A friend just rode it this summer, and I followed along via FB posts.

Great Divide Mountain Route

I have decided I want to ride the Tour Divide.

The Great Divide Route is the world’s longest off-pavement cycling route. It travels through Canadian provinces of Alberta and British Columbia, and the United States of Montana, Idaho, Wyoming, Colorado, and New Mexico (map). By route’s end a thru-rider will climb nearly 200,000 feet of vertical.

It’s Not Happening Anytime Soon

The goal is to do this in my 60th year or sooner. That gives me seven years to get in some sort of buff biking shape. Hey, I dreamed about running the Hardrock 100 for years before I actually got to do it.

It Sets Me up with More Short Term Goals

I have much to do and learn before attempting. Let alone figure out how to get that much vacation time off.

Learn all those parts on the bike and how they work

Yes, I finally am going to get interested in my bike and figure out how the parts work together.

Learn how to fix my bike

The only reason to learn all those bike parts is to be able to FIX my bike when it breaks down. This is a good goal to have regardless of where you are biking.

bike stencil

Become a better Biker

I’m now interested in becoming a better biker. I need to learn how to ride hills, gravel, dirt roads..which is good, because I have all of that available to me! I ventured out of my comfort zone just Thursday. Instead of riding my local seven mile flat asphalt trail out and back, I chose a route which turned that ride into a loop. Unknown to me, that meant taking a road so steep I had to walk the bike in two spots. But I did it, instead of turning around back to flat land!

I am now interested in different types of bike rides instead of looking for easy flat tours. It’s been awhile since I’ve had a focus in training. This is a good goal for me.

Day Two North Bend Rail Trail Wolf Summit to Pennsboro

 

Day Two Change of Direction

Not my elevation profile, from Ride With GPS https://ridewithgps.com/routes/9893679

That evening I do some elevation checking. Wolf Summit 1297 feet. It’s a gradual uphill from Pennsboro, 866 feet. Oh yeah, I’m going to start at Wolf Summit and go west to Pennsboro! The hubs has agreed. It’s not that far driving.

Wolf Summit Harrison County

It’s fairly easy to find the trail. The North Bend Rail Trail is VERY undermarked. I start down the trail and then find the official “mileage” start. 

The first miles west are a bit rough, then the surface becomes packed dirt, grass, single track. The first tunnel is very soon.

Brandy Gap Tunnel 1086 Feet Long

 

Salem

The town of Salem is a full service town-IGA grocery right on the trail, followed by a Dairy Queen, a bike repair station.

Salem North Bend Rail Trail

I stop for water right outside of Salem and talk to the only biker I see on the trail. He advises me a way to avoid the boggy section right outside of town.

 

I’ve outlined this on the map above. I doubt this wet section ever dries out. Ride the street-Long Run-parallel to the trail. The trail then intersects with the trail and pick up the trail and head west again.

The trail runs a bit parallel to Route 50, then veers off. The next big landmark is the Mark West Energy Sherwood Complex. It has been open since 2012.  

The trail is asphalt for about 1/10 of a mile as it passes by the plant.


The signage is the best on the trail! Then it was back to a grassy trail.

I pass by another pipeline being built. As of July 18, 2018, this area of the trail either had the pipeline laid, or was just getting ready. I  had no problem biking across the area.

Sherwood Tunnel 846 feet long

Sherwood Tunnel North Bend Rail Trail

 

Smithburg 

I am approaching civilization again. This tiny town is Smithburg. There is a bike repair station here. There is a general store across the road.

 

The sky is looking a bit omnimous as I bike through Smithburg. I start to turn on my phone to see what the weather will be like, but it won’t change anything. I bike on.

West Union

It is not long at all until the next town of West Union. Due to time constraints, I keep on biking.

I know I would be encountering the longest tunnel on the trail next, Central Station Tunnel.

It’s funny how some tunnels look. You can see to the other side-it must be about 350 feet long. Wrong! It’s the longest tunnel.

I get my big light out, turn on the two small bike lights, and ride the tunnel. I again forget to look at my watch to see how long it takes.

Okay, after Central Station I have one more tunnel and I should be very close to Pennsboro and the end of my ride! Which is good, because my rear is getting a bit sore on the bike. I should have changed saddles, but ran out of time pre-ride. Now I’m paying for it.

Ritchie County Again

Contrast the two photos, the one above in Doddridge County, and crossing the line back into Ritchie County-that’s a big change! I heard via the interwebs that Doddridge County had gotten a million dollar grant, hence the nicely new gravel and limestone trail I had been riding on.

Biggest bank heist

The trail through here is impressive. It’s been rebuilt sometime recently, you can tell.  

Only loose dogs

In this area, the trail makes an annoying habit of crossing roads in a curve. I had hopped off the bike to walk it across a busy road, when I looked left, and then heard the barking-three small dogs out in the road barking at me! Thankfully a car stopped and didn’t hit the dogs. The dogs were all friendly, in fact one small one followed me down the trail-I had to bike quickly to finally get the little guy to stop!

No more Pics

The rain is coming down heavily. There is thunder, but no lightning. I blow through Toll Gate (I only know it’s Toll Gate due to the wooden sign). Now I’m on an incline up heading toward my last tunnel.  The rain is turning the trail treads into little rivers. Where is that last tunnel? I have to rest twice on the way up. Finally! The last tunnel!

Now I’ve maybe a mile to go. I call the hubs to tell him to meet me at the Crossroads Cafe for lunch and order me a BLT and fries. I start biking-and drop the chain. Argh. I wipe the condensation from my glasses and behave nicer to Helga-just less than one mile, girl! I get to the Pennsboro Depot and every vehicle in the area seems to go down the street before I can cross. I snap a pic of the depot and triumphantly end my ride at the Crossroads Cafe.

 

Day Two Conclusions

The North Bend Rail Trail in 2018, is fine to ride. PROVIDED you ride the correct bike. A road bike won’t work. A loaded tour bike would be miserable. A bike with big tires, a mountain bike can handle this just fine.

Weather conditions will also temper your trip. I planned for mid summer or late summer. I got lucky and West Virignia had little rain before my trip.

This would be good for a two day journey with possible bike camping or treat yourself to the hotel in Elleboro mid way.

Come visit West Virginia and ride the North Bend Trail!

Day One Link

Bike Report Success on the North Bend Rail Trail

Bike Report North Bend Rail Trail WV

I did it! I biked the North Bend Rail Trail in northern West Virginia over two days. The shape of the trail is NOT as bad as advertised. In fact, this is why this ride report is rather long and full of pictures of empty trail-I wanted to get the word out in 2018, you CAN ride the NBRT!

Trailhead Parkersburg North Bend Rail Trail

We missed the trailhead driving down the road on Happy Valley. Heads up, it is next to a big blue farm. Soon as you see “Miller’s Landing” on your left, you will see the trailhead sign. Off I go. It’s a dry day, going to get hot soon. The trail is fine. It’s compacted dirt, sometimes grassed over, often just a single track-similar to the C&O Towpath Trail.North Bend Rail Trail

The first six miles the trail runs along the Little Kanawha River. There are houses and summer cabins along the trail.  I encounter no loose dogs and only two people walking their dog along the trail this morning. It’s just a nice green tunnel with occasional glimpses of the water.

It gets very quiet once the trail leaves the river. It’s remote and quiet…and remote and quiet. I wonder where my first tunnel is, thinking it’s about mile 11. I keep planning on stopping and taking a break, then decide to do so at the tunnel.

I pass the town of Walker on the backside. I can see there is a post office there. I wonder how far it would be from the highway in case one wanted to drive into Walker and cache water on the trail…and where is this tunnel anyways?  I consult my little list I made of major locations. Okay, tunnel isn’t until Mile 15! Time for a break!

Helga on the North Bend Rail Trail

 

 Eaton Tunnel 1840 feet long

North Bend Rail TrailThis tunnel is near a road and hence, graffitied. I was happy to see this was the only tunnel with graffiti. I turned on my two little bike lights. They were sufficient but I should have had them turned more toward the ground.Once through the tunnel, it’s some gradual downhill-whee! Biking is fun again!!

 Ritchie County

The trail conditions do not change as I enter Ritchie County (there is a small sign announcing the change.) I stop at mile eighteen, which is Petroleum. There is a nice gazebo with seat and a pit toilet.

Petroleum West Virginia

I have a snack and water and chat with a NBSP worker. He told me he and the other mower (that I had just passed) were responsible for  mowing the entire trail. Once they got to one end, it was time to start mowing again.

Bike Tool Kit North Bend Rail Trail

There are four bike repair stations along the trail! 

 Silver Run Tunnel 1376 feet long

North Bend Rail Trail

This is the haunted tunnel!

North Bend Rail Trail

Silver Run is reported to be haunted. I turn on both lights, and bring out my big headlamp. I see no haunts in the tunnel. It is pleasantly nice and cool in the tunnel.

Cairo

North Bend Rail Trail

I come to the town of Cairo, which looks kind of deserted. Shemp’s ice cream store is closed and for sale. (I find them again operating a food truck in Ellenboro-far more profitable.) Ice cream hopes dashed, I decide not to go into the restaurant next door.

Cairo West Virginia

I just want some water and Gatorade. I find that at Country Trails Bikes. I rehydrate, call the hubs and tell him where I am, and back into the green tunnel.

Bonds Creek

About two miles later,  I come to Bonds Creek Bridge, which was the sight of a huge derailment and fatalities. The trail to North Bend State Park is at this intersection.

 The Bonds Tunnel is the next tunnel to traverse.

Bonds Tunnel

North Bend Rail Trail

On the other side of the Bonds Tunnel is the Matt Turner Gazebo, a large shelter.

Matt Turner Gazebo

Tunnel 12   577 feet

The next tunnel is not too far from the Bonds Creek Tunnel, Tunnel 12

Tunnel 12

Patterson’s or  Dick Bias Tunnel

North Bend Rail Trail

North Bend Rail Trail

 

The next tunnel is not too far down the trail. This tunnel is called Patterson’s  but renamed in honor of  Dick Bias. The late Dick Bias played a key role in getting a trail established, forming the North Bend Rails to Trails Foundation and leading the negotiations with CSX. He personally directed the initial fundraising to acquire the old rail line for $350,000. Tunnel No. 10 is named after Bias, who died in 1995.

North Bend Rail Trail

This tunnel is different. It was never lined with wood or bricks, just left as is.

All tunnel-ness aside, I’m getting pretty tired of riding my bike and happy to be getting close to Ellenboro.  I know I am getting near when I pedal under Route 50.North Bend Rail Trail I know about the little incline up to the bridge-it’s fine.  I phone my hubs to bring me water so I don’t have to top at the very busy gas station in Ellenboro. I continue to pedal down on my way to Pennsboro.

Pennsboro

 

Finally! I see the Pennsboro Depot, but more importantly I see the sign for Crossroads Cafe, where I am meeting the hubs and hopefully eating dinner! They have great food-I had a burger and scrumptious fried green tomatoes-I definitely recommend them!

Day One Conclusion

Tunnels-Five tunnels to travel through. Do Bring a light

Bridges-Lots of bridges, I was counting, but then lost count

Water Supply-town of Cairo, Ellenboro, Pennsboro;  ride to the Lodge at North Bend State Park

Food-town of Cairo, Ellenboro, Pennsboro, ide to the Lodge at North Bend State Park

Trail Condition-being mid July and a dry month for the state of West Virginia, trails in good condition. Your ride may vary! I would not bring a road bike on this trail, or a loaded down tour bike. I think you would be miserable. There are some gravel, dirt, cinders, grass to ride on. A mountain bike or a bike with nice wide tires would be appropriate for this trail.

Trail markings-the North Bend Rail Trail is pretty much unmarked. BUT it’s kind of hard to miss this big flat surface that resembles a jeep road. You have to use common sense. This is about the only type of marker you will see:

Accommodations-you could camp pretty much anywhere on this trail. I might not camp in the next six miles around Parkersburg, as there are still houses along that section. But other than that, look at my pictures-no houses in sight, you could plop your tent right down on the trail. Other than that, North Bend State Park is on the trail, you could follow the side trail to the campground OR the lodge.

If you would rather stay inside halfway through your trip in either direction, I recommend the Sleep Inn in Ellenboro. It’s on the south side of Route 50, maybe 1/10 mile from the trail.  It’s a new hotel, indoor pool, great rooms. The included breakfast starts at 430 am!  That turned into a great halfway point for me to rest and fuel up.

Stay Tuned for Day Two of my North Bend Rail Trail Adventure! Thanks for reading, leave me comments or questions, I would be happy to answer!

 

Next Adventure: North Bend Trail West Virginia

 

North Bend Trail Adventure

 

The North Bend Rail Trail is on my list for Bike 2018. With a family reunion following on a 4 day weekend in July, my little wheels started spinning. This also had to involve a dinner at Cafe Cimino (2nd best meal we ever had) and the reunion.

Where is the North Bend Trail?

The North Bend Trail stretches from Parkersburg to Clarksburg West Virginia, in the northern part of the state. It’s parallel, more or less to Route 50. The North Bend Rail Trail offers a scenic experience with splendid railroad elements and welcoming trail towns to be enjoyed. Stretching nearly 72 miles from Interstate 77 near Parkersburg (Cedar Grove) to Wolf Summit, the trail travels through an impressive 13 tunnels (10 passable), crosses 36 bridges, and passes through or near an assortment of state, county, and local parks.

Not Highly Developed

The trail link entry mentions this should be done on a mountain bike, as many sections are dirt, grass, unmown grass. In otherwords, this is not going to be a beautiful asphalt, coasting along bike route.

From all intel gathered, the NBT needs a bunch of work. There are not many towns along the NBT-and the towns that are nearby, these are tiny towns! Like population under a 1000 people small!  Without folks interested in the trail, there are no trail maintainers.

There has been a feasability study released by Rails to Trails Conservancy about the possible Parkersburg to Pittsburgh (the P2P) trail. The 238-mile Parkersburg to Pittsburgh (P2P) rail-trail is already nearly 80 percent complete; just a few short gaps exist in West Virginia to unlock a contiguous 150-miles-plus stretch of the rail-trail from Parkersburg to the state’s border with Pennsylvania. Linking up with the Great Allegheny Passage Trail could also mean you could bike from Washington DC to Parkersburg West Virginia!

What is my Plan?

The trail is 72 miles long. A popular method is to bike 29 miles and then spend the night at Norrth Bend State Park-my orginial plan. The Lodge is booked! Plan Two!

If you ever travelled between Parkersburg and Clarksburg, it’s a great four lane highway. There are just a few tiny towns.  There does happen to be a Sleep Inn in Ellenboro, about 40 miles from Parkersburg which happened to have a room available.

I will be dropped off at the Parkersburg end of the trail, bike to Ellenboro, spend the night there, and finish the 30 miles the next day in Clarksburg.

What Will I Ride?

Helga and Me

I am taking Helga! My beloved fat bike. She will need a bit of work. I need to get the fenders up on her. I also need to make sure I can carry my front handlebar bag.

Helga at the Beach

I may also swap out my Terry saddle to Helga. I’ve not biked long distances on Helga. I need to get a few long distances up on Helga.

Ever ride the North Bend Trail in West Virginia?

Conclusions on Ohio to Erie Bike Trail Tour

My conclusions on biking from CIncinnati to Cleveland

 

Time sure goes quickly! Here are my conclusions, tips, lessons learned while riding the Ohio to Erie Bike Trail 2018:

1. Just go do it.

I was completely undertrained for this ride-or was I? Maybe I was overtrained for last summer CO/GAP trip? My longest ride was 34 miles this spring, cold weather dimmed my opportunities and desires to make it outside for long rides. I did ride my trainer about every day for one hour. I don’t know what *mileage* that would work out to.

2. Less Would Be More

I pushed myself mileage on this journey. I knew I was going to do more than one seventy mile day. Could I do it? Sure, I knew I could, I just didn’t know how tired I would be. 40 or 50 mile days would have been more pleasant, with more time to kick around, if one could afford that *time away*.

3.  More Trails Being Added All The Time

It is impressive how much bike trail there is in Ohio. There are more areas in Ohio developing. I’ve come to realize how versatile and valuable bike/walk/rail trails can be to a community-both for the physical health and the economic (tourism) for Ohio.

4. Resources

The number one resource is the Ohio to Erie Trail Organization maps. The set of 4 is about fifteen dollars.  Another resource, printed recently, is a book about the route, “A Path Through Ohio-A Cyclist’s Guide to the Ohio to Erie Trail”  2nd Edition, by Mark Looney.  Third resource would be to read bike reports from the Crazy Guy on a BIke Website. Crazy Guy is a web site devoted to bike touring. BIke touring reports are very interesting to read! But a caveat! Only read the most recent, like Looney’s 2nd edition, for good intel. The OTET has changed route parts, so a 2009 route is nothing like the 2018 route. For example, part of the OTET through Columbus used to use the Olentangy BIke Trail, now it uses the Alum Creek Trail.

5. Want to Ride The Ohio to Erie Trail Supported?

OTET has a fully supported ride every September! So if you don’t want to carry all your stuff, want company, and a place to sleep every night, check out the Ohio to Erie Adventure Ride!

6. My Trip Report, Day by Day

Here is my five day trip report:

Day One

Day Two

Day Three

Day Four

Day Five